How do you unleash the creativity within?

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Prosthetic artist Cecille Baun’s workplace featuring some of her most iconic designs, such as Darna and Zuma. Photo courtesy of GLOBE STUDIOS

Manila (CNN Philippines Life) — What does it take to become who you’re meant to be? Globe Studios’ The Kaleidoscope is a four-part mini documentary series that explores the lives of four creatives — a garbage boy-turned-danseur, a prosthetic artist, a street artist, and an award-winning actress — who are driven, passionate, and committed to the pursuit of excellence in their respective fields.

Jamil Montibon (Dance)

Jamil Montibon has had a hard life. He was a scavenger living in the slums when a teacher recommended him to try entering Ballet Manila. He remembers days when he would come into class with dirty hands and poor posture, days when he would question his capabilities and his place in the school. Yet he pushed himself to become as good as his classmates and instructors, continuing his training wherever he got the chance to. Montibon’s life and ballet are inextricable, and it is this drive that makes him someone to look up to and look out for in the world of dance.

Cecille Baun (Film)

 

When Cecille Baun’s husband passed away at a young age, Cecille had to make ends meet. She made do with what she knew and transformed her background in makeup into a career in film prosthetics. Baun chalks it all up to experimentation, days spent in her lab coming up with new inventions, but without this inventive spirit we wouldn’t have the iconic tiyanaks, kapres, and manananggals in our local films. Today, she spends most of her time passing her knowledge on to younger artists who hope to make a living off of prosthetics, just as she did.

KooKoo Ramos (Visual Art)

KooKoo Ramos has always been an artist. Growing up, she would draw all the time, whether she was just doodling on her sisters’ old notebooks or joining school art contests. This creativity brought her to an arts course in college, where she first dabbled in street art with her blockmates. From then on, she has been in love with the medium. While juggling corporate jobs and freelance work on the side, she would find the pull of street art and graffiti time and time again. For Ramos, it is the most fulfilling form of self-expression. She is now a full-time freelance artist.

The series illuminates the many struggles of being a creative — challenges which the three featured artists have learned to overcome. Their stories prove that though there is no formula to becoming a successful creator, amidst each challenge, one must always listen to the artist within.

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Learn more about The Kaleidoscope series here.