Is there a difference between sausages and franks?

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How do you train yourself to know the sausage? The best way: by eating all kinds. For starters, there’s Purefoods Deli’s selection of premium sausages: the Hungarian cheese, bockwurst, and schublig sausages, as well as its franks: German, angus beef, cheese, smoked turkey, and spicy pepper beef. Photo by MIGUEL NACIANCENO

Manila (CNN Philippines Life) — If you think a sausage is nothing more than ground or minced meat flavored with a few spices, you are wrong. In the same way that a pan de sal is different from dinner rolls or a purple yam is different from a sweet potato, a sausage cannot be simply dismissed as a hot dog or a frank. The similarity of its ingredients or appearance does not suffice to differentiate one kind from the other, as the place where the sausage is made, its cultural context, its manner of preparation, among many others — dictate its distinctiveness.

A frank, for example, is just a type of highly seasoned smoked sausage (common as street food in Germany), among the thousands of types of sausages all over the world. On the other hand, the term ‘sausage’ includes the frank and many other varieties of meat stuffed in a casing or cooked loose, smoked, cured, dried, and enjoyed in all its forms and sizes.

So how do you train yourself to know the sausage? The best way: by eating all kinds. For starters, there’s Purefoods Deli’s selection of premium sausages: the Hungarian cheese, bockwurst, and schublig sausages, as well as its franks: German, angus beef, cheese, smoked turkey, and spicy pepper beef. But for those who’d like a brief primer on how to distinguish one from the other, here are a few tips to enhance your palate.

Purefoods Deli Sampling A sampling of Purefood Deli’s varied sausages and franks. While they look the same, each is distinct in taste and texture, having been prepared with a unique blend of spices. Photo by MIGUEL NACIANCENO

Ingredients

Food has always been influenced by its surroundings. The availability of ingredients and the impact of local culture inevitably makes its way into the plate, in a process called indigenization. Arguably, the story of the sausage is a story of indigenization, and to differentiate one sausage from the other is to dive into the thousand-or-more varieties and the innumerable ingredients that can accompany the sausage. Ingredients are often dictated by the sausage’s origins.

German sausages are said to have subtler flavors, with common seasonings such as salt, white pepper, and mace. The rest is up to the region where it comes from. A bockwurst, for example, is seasoned with chives, leeks, and green onions. A frankfurter traditionally is made of pork, stuffed in natural sheep casing. On the other hand, the Swiss sausage schublig includes nonfat dried milk, onions, and other spices.

Schublig Purefoods Deli Schublig from Purefoods Deli. Photo by MIGUEL NACIANCENO

In the Philippines, Purefoods Deli offers a variety of franks and sausages — including bockwurst, schublig, and Hungarian cheese sausages — that are blended with spices reminiscent of European flavors. Its line of franks also include a variety of unique ingredients, such as certified angus beef and turkey.

Elsewhere, a reddish Spanish chorizo is distinguished by the spice pimenton, while the South Korean sundae includes glass noodles and other vegetables with its meat. There are many sausage varieties made of blood (an effective binder that keeps food from falling apart): the Spanish/South American morcilla and the French boudin are examples. In Greece, they have the loukanika, a pork sausage flavored with orange rind.

Angus Beef Franks from Purefoods Deli Angus Beef Franks from Purefoods Deli. Photo by MIGUEL NACIANCENO

Origins

With European traders on a race to explore the globe, the sausage found its way beyond the region’s borders. With the dizzying array of sausages now available around the world, the easiest way to differentiate is to mark a sausage by its country. There is, inevitably, a variety of sausages present in each one, with an ingredient or method of preparation modified to reflect a country’s context.

A sausage’s origin also provides a bit of history; the andouille, for example, also tells the story of how French immigrants and Acadian exiles (expelled from Canada) settled in the U.S. Sausage origins also offer a clue into a country’s culinary identity: the flavorful chorizo speak of the richness of Spanish and South American cuisine, while the kamaboko (fish sausage) reflects the simplicity and restraint of Japanese cooking.

Preparation

Sausages developed as a way to consume and preserve small scraps of meat. It is prepared in several ways: fresh, smoked, dried, cured, or cooked. A fresh sausage is sold raw in markets, to be cooked immediately. This type of sausage, which includes bratwursts and country sausages, developed in cooler climates. Smoked, dried, and cured sausages developed in warmer areas where preservation was difficult, yet essential. With the advent of refrigeration, however, these methods developed more towards enhancing flavors.

To cure a sausage, for example, is to treat it with salt — the word sausage itself comes from the Latin “salsus,” which means salted. The Spanish chorizo is a popular type of cured sausage, as well as the Italian salami. Dried sausages include the Turkish sucuk, which is air dried for weeks. Smoked sausages, meanwhile, include the andouille and kielbasa, which are popular in deli shops. Purefoods Deli offers its own version in its smoked turkey franks, which come with less fat.

Both local and international sausages meld into the Philippines’ hotpot of flavors. For a taste of European sausages, Purefoods Deli’s sausages and franks provide an easy and delicious experience, keeping true to the taste of its origins.

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Food styling by Chichi Tullao

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For a taste of European sausages, Purefoods Deli’s sausages and franks provide an easy and delicious experience, available in supermarkets nationwide.