#SuperficialGazette? Netizens slam Official Gazette for 'historical revisionism'

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The Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines draws flak from netizens late Sunday for supposedly applying "historical revisionism" in its post commemorating the birth anniversary of late President Ferdinand Marcos late Sunday. For its part, the Official Gazette says it is "not in the business of revising history" and only states "what is documented in the official records."

Metro Manila (CNN Philippines) — Netizens slammed the Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines late Sunday for supposedly applying "historical revisionism" in its post commemorating the birth anniversary of late dictator and President Ferdinand Marcos.

The post contained a graphic of Marcos, with a quote from his second inaugural at the Quirino Grandstand in 1969.

The original caption read:

Celebrating his 99th birthdate, Ferdinand Marcos started his political career in 1949 as a Representative of the Second District of Ilocos Norte. 10 years thereafter, Marcos was able to secure a seat as a member of the Philippine Senate in 1959 and was elected Senate President in 1963. Ferdinand Marcos became the 10th President of Philippines in 1965. He was the longest-serving President of the country for almost 21 years.

Marcos was the first post-independence president to be re-elected in 1969. In 1972, he declared Martial Law to suppress a communist insurgency and secessionism in Mindanao.

In 1986, Marcos stepped down from the presidency to avoid bloodshed during the uprising that came to be known as "People Power".

Netizens criticized the words used by Official Gazette as "historical revisionism."

 

Abigail Valte, spokesperson of former President Benigno Aquino III, also took to social media her reaction on the Official Gazette post.

 

The Official Gazette deleted the post, and uploaded a new one, taking out the phrase "to avoid bloodshed", and the words "Martial Law" and "People Power Revolution".

The new post read:

Ferdinand Marcos started his political career in 1949 as a Representative of the Second District of Ilocos Norte. 10 years thereafter, Marcos was able to secure a seat as a member of the Philippine Senate in 1959 and was elected Senate President in 1963. Ferdinand Marcos became the 10th President of Philippines in 1965. He was the longest-serving President of the country for almost 21 years.

This post was edited again later on, adding the clause "declaring Martial Law in 1972 then went to exile to the United States in 1986 at the height of the People Power Revolution" and the sentence "He was succeeded by Corazon Cojuangco Aquino."

 

The revisions did not stop the criticisms, as #SuperficialGazette is still one of the trending topics on Twitter as of 10 a.m. Monday, and the Facebook page "Superficial Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines" was created as a parody of the Official Gazette.

In a statement released late Sunday, the Official Gazette said it is "not in the business of revising history" and only states "what is documented in the official records."

The Official Gazette maintained that it is consistent in updating materials to be "historically accurate as possible" and that it is "devoid of any political color and affiliations."