Police file illegal drugs, firearms charges vs. Ozamiz City Vice Mayor, brother

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The mugshots of Ozamiz City Vice Mayor Nova Parojinog and her brother, Reynaldo Parojinog Jr.

Metro Manila (CNN Philippines, August 1) — Charges were filed against Ozamiz City Vice Mayor Nova Parojinog and her brother, Reynaldo Parojinog Jr., despite questions this was done beyond the period set by law.

They are facing charges of illegal possession of firearms and drugs.

Their lawyer Ferdinand Topacio said, while government lawyers noted their opposition, the prosecutors still ruled the arrest was valid.

That's why the panel still accepted the complaints filed by the police.

Topacio said his clients were arrested on Sunday at around 6 in the morning. The cases must have been filed before 6 in the evening of  Monday.

Police presented as evidence firearms and a kilogram of shabu, among others.

Topacio said, "Kinukunsidera po namin ng seryoso ang paghahain ng  reklamo para sa paglabag ng Artikulo 125 ng Revised Penal Code dahil  lumampas po ng 36 hours yung pong pagkaditene ng aming mga kliyente  na wala pong na-inquest at wala pong pina-file na mga charges."

[Translation: We are seriously considering filing a complaint for the  violation of Article 125 of the Revised Penal Code because our clients'  were detained for more than 36 hours where there was no inquest and  no charges were filed.]

The Philippine National Police (PNP) released the mugshots of Ozamiz City Vice Mayor Nova Parojinog and her brother, Reynaldo Parojinog Jr. Tuesday after their arrest Sunday.

Both Parojinogs were flown from Ozamiz City yesterday following early-morning raids Sunday where 15 people including their father,  mother, aunt, and uncle were killed.

Nova and Reynaldo Jr. underwent inquest proceedings at the PNP's  headquarters in Camp Crame, Quezon City.

Dela Rosa: Raids were legit

Chief Director General Ronald Dela Rosa on Monday insisted the simultaneous operations by authorities that killed Ozamiz Mayor Reynaldo Parojinog Sr. and 14 others were legitimate, adding they would have lived if they did not resist the search.

READ: PNP Chief: Ozamiz raids legitimate, no rubout of Parojinogs

"They were meant to be operated upon, not liquidated. Depende na 'yun kung manlaban sila, then magkakaroon ng engkwentro. Wala na tayong control," he said in a media briefing.

[Translation: It depends. If they fight back, then there will be an encounter. We won't have control over that.]

READ: PNP Chief: Ozamiz raids legitimate, no rubout of Parojinogs

Criminal Investigation and Detection Group (CIDG) Director Roel Obusan said they followed protocol for police operations.

"Matagal naming pinagplanuhan [We planned for this]. In fact, we followed all procedures of the PNP, as well as the law. We applied for search warrant," Obusan said at the same news briefing.

Northern Mindanao Police Chief Supt. Timoteo Pacleb said the Region 10 Criminal Investigation and Detection Group (CIDG) together with Misamis Occidental Police Provincial Office and Ozamiz City Police Station were approaching the mayor's residence when Parojinog's men fired shots at the officers and triggered a shootout between the two groups.

Aside from the mayor's house, police also raided Vice Mayor Nova Parojinog's house, two of the Parojinog clan's farms, and other properties, Pacleb said.

Three rifle grenades, bags of suspected illegal drug shabu, a firearm, and cash were found inside the mayor's house, Ozamiz City stringer Thata Roxas from the Mindanaoan Broadcasting Channel told CNN Philippines.

Suspected shabu, an M-16 rifle, and cash were also found inside Vice Mayor Nova Parojinog's house.

READ: Ozamiz City Mayor, 14 others killed in police raids

Meanwhile, the Commission on Human Rights said it has started an investigation into Sunday's raids.

In an interview with CNN Philippines Monday, CHR Spokesperson Atty. Jacqueline de Guia said the purpose of the investigation would be "to find out whether or not protocols were followed, and whether or not the rule of law was upheld in this circumstance."

CNN Philippines' Amanda Lingao, Pia Garcia, and Lara Tan contributed to this story.

Story updated 6:40 a.m. of August 2 to include revisions to sixth paragraph.