Callamard calls for probe on all 'unlawful' deaths following Kian slay

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(File photo)UN Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions Agnes Callamard

Metro Manila (CNN Philippines, August 27) — The United Nations' special rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions called on the government to investigate all unlawful killings following the death of Kian Delos Santos.

Agnes Callamard sent out a series of tweets on Saturday, among them a message extending her condolences to Kian's family "and to all families vindicated by this cruel war."

She followed up the tweet with the hashtags #Makehisdeaththelast and #Philippines.

 

Callmard retweeted a number of news reports on Kian's death, at one point addressing President Rodrigo Duterte with the message: "Yes, Pent Duterte, this is murder."

Kian, 17, was killed in an anti-drug operation in Caloocan City on Aug. 16. His death drew widespread outrage, prompting calls to put an end to killings in the drug war.

In February, she told CNN Philippines, "Any death at the hands of the state, meaning any death caused by the state, is in and by itself a possible extrajudicial killing."

She added, "All unlawful deaths must be investigated. To stop all muderers."

In another tweet she said the results of Kian's autopsy confirms his "execution," and that it is the "latest symbol of a massive, government-led, human rights crisis."

Callamard has been outspoken of her criticism of the Duterte administration's war on drugs.

Her tweets mirror an earlier statement where she said killings involving the police could be extra-judicial and must be investigated

READ: U.N. special rapporteur: All killings by the police should be probed

In February, she told CNN Philippines, "Any death at the hands of the state, meaning any death caused by the state, is in and by itself a possible extrajudicial killing."

Callamard also earned the government's ire after she arrived in the country in May to speak at a drug policy forum.

Malacañang said it was not notified of Callamard's visit.

Presidential Spokesperson Ernesto Abella said Callamard's arrival "circumvents all recognized United Nations protocols for such visits."

READ: Malacañang slams visit of UN rapporteur to PH

Callamard, however, said she did inform the government of her visit.

READ: U.N. Special Rapporteur: I informed PH of my visit

Callamard had expressed her intention to visit the country  to investigate alleged extrajudicial killings in the drug war.

The government had set three conditions for Callamard to  continue with her probe: Callamard must have a public debate with President Rodrigo Duterte before the media; Duterte must be allowed to ask her questions; and she has to take an oath.

READ: U.N. special rapporteur rejects government conditions

Callamard rejected these conditions, telling CNN Philippines it is not consistent with the code of conduct for special rapporteurs.

"I cannot build trust, including with the police or with the  government, if there is a threat of public debate at the end  of the mission," Callamard said.

CNN Philippines' Digital Producers Amanda Lingao and Regine Cabato, and Senior Digital Producer Lara Tan contributed to this report.