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The Muslim world commemorates the end of the holy month of Ramadan or Eid'l Fitr this weekend.

The faith of displaced Marawi residents remains firm amid the turmoil in their city. They prepare in their own little ways to observe Eid'l Fitr or the end of Ramadan.

Still no end in sight in government's campaign to regain full control of the war-torn city, exactly a month since Marawi came under a terror siege. Tonight, the threat persisting even in what was declared as safe zones in Marawi.

As bombs fell in Marawi City, two mothers risked their lives to give birth. Their children, born under the ravages of war, bear names marking this remarkable moment in their lives.

Almost a month since the fighting in Marawi broke out, the President faced its displaced residents for the first time.

President Rodrigo Duterte visited Iligan City this afternoon, which is a little over 30 kilometers away from the battlefield.

Amid a relentless government offensive to retake parts of Marawi still being held by the terrorists, operating troops stumble on what could be the biggest haul of illegal drugs in the war-torn city.

Despite being an Islamic City, Christians are free to practice their faith in Marawi. As the siege goes on, a church leader travels there to show support not only for Christians, but for the Muslim residents as well.

Government troops stuggle to flush out Maute fighters to liberate Marawi, on day 26 of the firefight.

They did not make it out of Marawi alive. Eleven bodies — six male, five female — have been left unclaimed for weeks now in a funeral home in Iligan city. Among them is a girl about five years of age, a victim of a stray bullet. These unidentified remains are buried in a public cemetery with only government workers arranging for the burial, and then attending the modest funeral. Iligan is taking care of both the dead and the living from Marawi as it now provides refuge for thousands of evacuees from the war-torn city.