CULTURE

How teachers are coping with online learning

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Bad internet connection, noise, and lack of guidance — these are just some of the many obstacles that our educators now face when it comes to teaching in the new normal.

The sudden shift to online learning has caused the country, firstly, to assess how slow and expensive internet connection is. A report states that only 55 percent of Filipinos, and only 26 percent of public schools. Many students and teachers were not ready.

Related: As COVID-19 forces life to move online, who is left behind?

A year into community quarantine, teachers are still having a hard time adjusting to the new way of teaching.

“It’s very hard for me transferring things online, knowing that I have a group of people who do not have very good internet at home,” says teacher Liza Pe who works at a pre-school. [Even us teachers]... we cannot leave the house so we only have to rely [on] the internet that we have.”

“I’ve always believed that one-one-one face to face interaction is more effective for [children,]” says Joanna Medina, a Special Education specialist.

Bad internet connection, noise, and lack of guidance — these are just some of the many obstacles that our educators now face when it comes to teaching in the new normal.

Related: OPINION: An ‘academic freeze’ is the best option for Filipino students for now

In the interview below, Medina and Pe talk more about the challenges and surprises of remote learning, what parents can do to help them.

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Video and interview by Samantha Lee.