Anti-Marcos groups: 'Fight is not yet over'

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Metro Manila (CNN Philippines) — Human rights lawyer Neri Colmenares said the Supreme Court ruling on Tuesday is "infuriating," a sentiment shared by other martial law victims like him.

"This is a horrible ending to one of the darkest chapters of Philippine history."

Colmemares was among half a dozen petitioners that sought to stop the burial of late strongman Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani.

Anti-Marcos demonstrators earlier marched from Rizal Park to Padre Faura St, to stage a rally in front of the Supreme Court, where pro-Marcos supporters also held an overnight vigil.

"Parang gusto kong sumigaw at ilabas ko lahat ng luha ko (I want to scream and cry out all my tears.)," Carmencita Florentin, a human rights victim, addressed the protesters after learning about the court's decision.

"Mamatay na lang ako, hinding-hindi na ako maniniwala sa gobyerno natin, sa hustisya natin," Florentin told CNN Philippines in a separate interview.

Related: Supreme Court Justices explain their votes against a hero's burial for Marcos

It was an emotional day for pro and anti Marcos forces, but especially for victims of abuses during the Marcos regime.

"So what does that make us, sinungaling kami (we're liars)? What does that make of the millions of people who flocked to EDSA in 1986 to overthrow the dictator? Ano pala sila, mga sira ulo? Bayani pala si Marcos (Were they crazy? Apparently, Marcos is a hero)," Colmenares said.

Colmenares was a young student leader when he was arrested and tortured by security forces during martial law.

For all the cases of human rights abuses and plunder the Supreme Court upheld against the late dictator, Colmenares finds its latest decision as a "tectonic shift."

"Dehado kami, sila ang nandehado, hanggang ngayon pala, dehado pa rin kami," Colmenares said, noting that none of the Marcoses went to jail for their "offenses" against the Filipino people.

A number of martial law victims also spoke out in the rally, attended by at least 200 protesters, to denounce the high tribunal's ruling.

"Apat na kamag-anak ko, ang nawawala sa panahong ng walang hiyang si Marcos. Tapos ililibing sa Libingan ng mga Bayani?" Fred Gonzales, a member of Pamalakaya, a fisherfolk organization, told reporters.

"Ilibing na lang yan sa Batac, gawin nilang bagoon kung gusto nila," he said in a jest.

Colmenares said they will have to study whether to file a motion for reconsideration.

They will ask government to delay the burial for at least a month — until the high tribunal resolves the issue with finality.

"E kung manalo kami sa MR, alangan namang huhukayin mo pa ulit yun," Colmenares pointed out, "konting respeto namin, don't bury him hastily."

There will also be more street demonstrations to persistently urge President Duterte to change his stance on the issue.

"The fight is not yet over," protesters shouted as they hold a noise barrage for one minute outside the Supreme Court.

Other protesters, this early, are threatening to deface Marcos' burial site, to mourn what they say, the death of justice in the country.