Iceland hopes PH will work with UN on human rights probe

enablePagination: false
maxItemsPerPage: 10
totalITemsFound:
maxPaginationLinks: 10
maxPossiblePages:
startIndex:
endIndex:

Iceland claimed tabling the resolution followed repeated calls from UN authorities and member-states to address reports of extrajudicial killings and rights violations in the Philippines, and to work with UN mechanisms "that have not been granted access to the country."

Metro Manila (CNN Philippines, July 18) — Iceland is hoping the Philippines will cooperate with the United Nations in the human rights probe, despite President Rodrigo Duterte considering cutting diplomatic ties between the two countries.

"Icelandic authorities sincerely hope that the Philippine authorities will engage the UN on this and the resolution," Iceland's Ministry of Foreign Affairs said in a statement obtained by CNN Philippines Thursday.

Duterte has slammed Iceland for sponsoring a resolution adopted by the United Nations Human Rights Council, which calls for a UN report on the human rights situation in the Philippines. His spokesperson, Sal Panelo, had said the President is considering cutting ties with Iceland over this resolution.

The Nordic nation said it dealt with human rights concerns in the UN in a non-politicized way. This ran counter to President Duterte's speculations of activists from within Iceland or somewhere else are feeding "the wrong information."

"For a small and peaceful country like Iceland, international law and the multilateral system is our sword, shield and shelter. Therefore, when Iceland became a new member of the Council last year, Iceland pledged to address human rights concerns objectively and, on their merits, in a non-politicised, non-selective manner," it said.

Iceland also insisted the resolution is focused on getting facts straight, since the Philippine government is accusing other nations of banking of "false narratives" regarding the human rights situation in the country.

"The resolution is, however, very modest, focusing on impartiality and cooperation with the U.N. to get clarity around the contested facts. The resolution also reaffirms the determination of U.N. member states to tackle the world drug problem and enjoyed the support of countries facing their own serious drug problem," he said.

Mexico, a country hounded by narcotics issues, is also among the 18 countries that voted in favor of adopting the resolution.

Iceland claimed tabling the resolution followed repeated calls from UN authorities and member-states to address reports of extrajudicial killings and rights violations in the Philippines, and to work with UN mechanisms "that have not been granted access to the country."

Duterte had previously said he would allow the UN to look into alleged human rights violations, but took it back and said he will not subject himself to any foreign interrogation.

The resolution was adopted during the council's 41st regular session. The report on the Philippines' situation from UN Human Rights Chief Michelle Bachelet is expected to come out in the 44th regular session.