No homework to lead to ‘poor study habit’ – psychologist

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Prohibiting schools from assigning homework to students may have detrimental effects on a child’s learning capabilities, a child psychologist claimed, contrary to the argument of education officials. (FILE PHOTO)

Metro Manila (CNN Philippines, August 29) — Prohibiting schools from assigning homework to students may have detrimental effects on a child’s learning capabilities, a child psychologist claimed, contrary to the argument of education officials.

Speaking to CNN Philippines on Thursday, Jhon Carandang from The Masters Psychological Services said removing homework from a student’s study practice is “dangerous.” He said that students must review what they learned from school to hone their minds.

“It will be dangerous for the child to have no homework because it would lead to a poor study habit,” he explained. “Magde-decline learning capability ng bata, hindi maho-hone ‘yung skills, hindi madedevelop ‘yung skills na natutunan sa classroom.”

[Translation: The learning capability of the child will decline. They cannot hone and develop the skills they learn in the classroom.]

The Department of Education (DepEd) on Wednesday aired its support for a bill that seeks to enforce a “No Homework” policy in schools. The DepEd said the policy will “enable learners to have more quality time with their parents, family, and friends” to aid their holistic development.

There are currently two bills on homework bans filed at the House of Representatives and one at the Senate. House Bill 3883, filed by Quezon City Representative Alfred Vargas this month, sought to ban homework only on weekends, citing research that suggests homework reduces family time and negatively impacts a child’s interest in learning.

Sorsogon Representative Evelina Escudero also filed House Bill 3611, seeking to ban homework entirely for students in kindergarten up to Grade 12 levels and prohibiting them from bringing their textbooks out of school, to “lighten the physical burden" of attending school. Senator Grace Poe also filed a measure on Wednesday proposing a law that would ban homework for kindergarten to Grade 12 students on weekends.

"No Homework" policy is consistent with the DepEd's memorandum order 392 issued in 2010, which already prohibits assigning homework on weekends, DepEd said.

“Our department reiterates its support to the holistic development of our learners by enabling them to have a balance of academic development and that of their professional growth and that’s giving them more time to be with their families,” said Leila Areola, DepEd Bureau of Learning Delivery Director.

However, Carandang said ensuring that children will have sufficient time to complete their homework would be a better alternative.

“I believe that there should only be some regulation of giving homework, like for instance, if you have six subjects, I believe that there should be some ample time to submit those tasks and even homework,” he said.

Areola admitted the department has yet to further study the effects of the “No Homework” policy on the student’s learning process.

“Actually what we’re going to do in the Department of Education, we have to do further studies of the most probably severe repercussion of this proposed bill to the teaching-learning process, and that’s something we still have to talk about,” she said.