First batch of prematurely-released convicts surrender

enablePagination: false
maxItemsPerPage: 10
totalITemsFound:
maxPaginationLinks: 10
maxPossiblePages:
startIndex:
endIndex:

FILE PHOTO

Metro Manila (CNN Philippines, September 5) — Hours after President Rodrigo Duterte's order, the first batch of prematurely-released convicts have surrendered to authorities.

Justice Secretary Menardo Guevarra on Thursday said "not more than 10" have come forward after Duterte gave the 15-day deadline for all convicts released under the controversial Good Conduct Time Allowance (GCTA) to turn themselves in. Several released convicts have also sent feelers for their recommittment to prison, he added.

"We hope many more will follow within the next 15 days so we don't have to do some coercive measures," he said during the Senate panel's third hearing into the GCTA mess.

Guevarra said those who want to surrender can go to police stations or military units nationwide, state they are heionous crime convicts, and then the Philippine National Police or Armed Forces of the Philippines will coordinate with the Bureau of Corrections.

He also said the DOJ is working on issuing an immigration lookout bulletin order against the released heinous crime convicts.

Duterte on Wednesday warned that released convicts that don't surrender within the given deadline will be treated like fugitives. The Justice Chief said they will be found evading their sentence. 

"Pinababalik sila within 15 days voluntarily. If they don't, they'll be considered fugitives. That's evading sentence. That's a continuing offense hangga't di sila nagtu-turn in ng sarili nila. So that provides an avenue for warrantless arrest," he said in an ambush interview. 

Duterte on Wednesday warned that released convicts that don't surrender within the given deadline will be treated like fugitives. The Philippine National Police will start deploying tracker teams before the deadline to easily locate convicts when it's time to arrest them.