DOH logs 356 new COVID-19 cases, lowest in 17 months

enablePagination: false
maxItemsPerPage: 10
totalITemsFound:
maxPaginationLinks: 10
maxPossiblePages:
startIndex:
endIndex:

The Department of Health (DOH) recorded 356 new COVID-19 infections on Tuesday, the lowest in 17 months, bringing the nationwide tally to 2,835,345. (FILE PHOTO)

Metro Manila (CNN Philippines, December 7) — The Department of Health (DOH) recorded 356 new COVID-19 infections on Tuesday, the lowest in 17 months, bringing the nationwide tally to 2,835,345.

It's the lowest daily count since July 2, 2020, when there were less than 300 new cases.

Of the case total, 0.5% or 13,026 are active or people currently ill - with 5,314 having mild symptoms, 3,900 in moderate condition, 2,326 with severe symptoms, 899 with no symptoms, and 587 in critical condition.

The death toll climbed to 49,591 - which is 1.75% of the COVID-19 count - after 92 more people lost their lives to the disease.

The DOH said out of the 92 newly reported deaths, only three occurred this month while 18%, or approximately 17, occurred in November. The delayed reporting was due to late encoding of data, the agency explained.

Meanwhile, 871 others got better, raising the recovery count to 2,772,728 - which is 97.8% of the case total.

The DOH said it reclassified 87 survivors as among the dead after validation, and deleted six duplicate recoveries. There were also 159 cases - of which 157 were recoveries - that were found to have actually tested negative and were removed from the record.

Data from eight laboratories were excluded from the total - two did not operate on Dec. 5 while six failed to submit their reports on time. These laboratories contributed an average of 0.4% of tested samples and 3.6% of positive individuals in the last 14 days.

The positivity rate - or percentage of tested people with positive results - remained low at 1.4% based on 24,360 tests reported on Dec. 5.

The figure has been below 2% for the past six days, and below 5% since Nov. 11.

According to the World Health Organization, countries or regions may reopen once they maintain a positivity rate of below 5% for at least 14 days.

But the potentially more infectious Omicron variant has kept border restrictions tight. The OCTA research group has also advised authorities to prepare for the variant's possible spread.